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  1. I had the same initial problem when Pirsig was recommended to me years ago. I assumed any book as popular as Zen would be nothing more than a collection of pseudo-intellectual sayings and proverbs with no real great message. I finally gave it a chance and realized it was saying something that, as you said, “clicked” with me. The thought that quality is its own entity that drives the universe rather than a matter of preference that is subordinate to subject or object was really fascinating and led me to purchase Lila shortly after finishing Zen. I’ve read over both a couple of times now and, like you, am unsure if the Metaphysics of Quality is right or wrong or if that is even an appropriate way to describe it. I doubt I’ll ever reach a complete sense of certainty, but that is what I consider to be the best part about Pirsig: his ideas do not lead you to a sense of finality, they provide you with sensible alternatives to consider while you’re trying to form your own view of the universe. Glad to see you gave the old book a read.

  2. Great comment Matt. Thanks for taking the time to read and engage. Especially liked:

    “I doubt I’ll ever reach a complete sense of certainty, but that is what I consider to be the best part about Pirsig: his ideas do not lead you to a sense of finality, they provide you with sensible alternatives to consider while you’re trying to form your own view of the universe.”

  3. Pirsig’s books blew my mind, like LSD once did, but more like an explosion in reverse motion. Only one important concept is missing from his metaphysics of quality: nothingness. To noth or not to noth: that is the question.

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